>

How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website

How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website

Apr 23, 2024

|

6 min read

|

How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website
How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website
How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website

What Is Schema Markup?


Schema markup, often referred to as structured data, is a semantic vocabulary of tags that people can add to their HTML to improve the way search engines read and represent their web pages in search results.


In layman's terms, it’s a piece of code you add to your website’s tag to give search engines like Google a better understanding of your page and give your page a chance of getting featured in rich snippets.


Let’s look at an example to better understand how schema markup works.


Let’s say you have a recipes blog and decide not to use schema markup. Here’s how Google will show your recipe in the SERP:


examples of search results without schema markup


But if you do have a schema markup, here’s how they will be shown:


examples of search results without schema markup


Which one are you more likely to click on? I think we both know the answer.


Schema markup is often associated with SEO, but does it actually help you rank higher?


Does Schema Markup Help With SEO?


Yes, schema markup is definitely beneficial for SEO. Not because it directly impacts your ranking position, but because there are two indirect benefits of using it.


First, it can enhance how your page is displayed on search result pages and give you a higher chance of attracting clicks, which will still result in more traffic.


Secondly, a higher click-through rate (CTR) is generally considered one of the signals Google uses to determine whether users like your page, which could slightly improve rankings over time.


All in all, adding schema markup is definitely beneficial in terms of SEO.


Now, let’s look at different types of schema you can implement on your website.


Types Of Schema Markup


Not all pages need structured data. And even if you could find a suitable schema for every page on your website, it’s definitely not necessary or beneficial.


So, let’s quickly go over a list of the most common and useful types of schema that Google currently supports:


Article


This schema type is used to mark up articles, blog posts, news stories, and other types of written content.


It includes properties for the headline, author, publication date, main image, and article body.


Using this type of structured data helps search engines understand the structure and content of your articles, potentially leading to enhanced presentation in search results with rich snippets.


Here’s how the news featured snippet looks like:


example of article enriched snippet in Google


Product


The product schema marks up (physical) products sold on e-commerce websites.


It includes properties such as name, description, brand, price, availability, and reviews.


Product snippets are one of Google's most used schemas and can help you win a lot of real estate in the search result pages.


Here’s an example:


example of product enriched snippet in Google


Organisation


The Organisation schema is used to mark up information about an organisation or company, including its name, logo, contact information, and social media profiles.


It can help Google better understand all the information regarding your organisation and display it in a big rich snippet box on the right side of the search results.


Here’s an example from Framer itself:


Framer's enriched snippet in Google


Recipe


This schema type is used to mark up recipes, including details such as ingredients, cooking instructions, preparation time, and nutrition information.


I’ve already shown an example above of how these rich snippets look in search engines, so I won’t re-upload the same photo again :)


FAQ


The FAQPage schema marks up frequently asked questions (FAQs) and their corresponding answers on a web page.


This is not to be confused with the “People Also Ask” question.


Here’s an image to better understand the difference:


Difference between PPA (People Also Ask) section and FAQ Schema in search results


How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website


Now that you understand what schema markup is and the most popular types, let’s look at how you can implement it into your own Framer website.


Framer only supports adding schema through JSON-LD, which is also what Google recommends, so we’ll use that.


And don’t worry - you don’t need any technical knowledge to write it. I will show you a tool that creates the markup, so you just need to copy and paste it.


So, here’s a step-by-step guide on how to implement it:


Step 1 - Choose The Kind Of Schema You Want To Use


The first step is to choose the schema you’ll use on each page.


While I’ve shown you some of the most common ones, that’s not to be considered a complete list.


For reference, here’s a list of the 35 schema types Google currently supports.


As I mentioned, not every page needs a schema markup. So, if you don’t find one that suits your case, move on to the next page.


Step 2 - Write The JSON-LD Command


The second step will be to write the JSON-LD information you want to place into your page’s tag.


To do that, I highly suggest you use this free online schema markup generator.


Just select the kind of schema you want to implement, and it will guide you through the whole process.


Merkle - schema markup generator


Important Note On Referencing Images:

Currently, there’s no easy way to reference images from the schema markup in Framer. To solve the problem, I’ve come up with two possible workarounds:


  1. Publish the page first and then copy the URL.

    → If you want to keep everything limited to Framer, you can publish the page first and then use the developer tools to see at which address the page is being stored. Once you know that, come back to the schema markup and hardcode the URL.


  2. Use an external CDN.

    → Otherwise, you can store and serve your images with an external CND. I personally use Cloudinary, as their free plan is very generous (not sponsored). To use it, sign up for a free account, upload the images, copy the URL, and paste it into the schema markup.


Step 3 - Paste The Schema In The Tag


Once you’re done creating the schema, copy and paste it into your page's tag.


To do that, go to site settings, select the page to which you want to apply the schema, paste it into the tag, save, and publish your changes.


Once you’ve done that, it’s always best practice to ensure everything works fine.


Step 4 - Validate The Schema


To validate the schema, open this simple schema validator and paste the URL of the page you want to test.


If you see 0 errors and zero warnings, congratulations! Your schema markup is working as intended.


schema markup validator


Now, all you have to do is repeat the whole process for every page, and you’ll be done.


Schema Markup For CMS Pages


Writing schema markup for static pages is relatively straightforward. However, the process gets a bit trickier when the page is CMS-generated.


If you want to create a different schema markup for every CMS item, you’ll have to reference specific fields from the schema using this syntax:


{{ FieldName | json }}


For example, here’s what the schema markup for my blog looks like:


<script type="application/ld+json">
    {
      "@context": "https://schema.org",
      "@type": "BlogPosting",
      "headline": {{Title | json}},
      "articleSection": {{Category | json}},
      "description": {{Description | json}},
      "inLanguage": "en-US",
      "image": {{ImageURL | json}},
      "datePublished": {{Published | json}},
      "dateModified": {{Modified | json}},
      "author": {
          "@type": "Person",
          "name": "Luca Da Corte",
          "url": "https://www.dacorte.dev/about"
        },
      "publisher": {
        "@type": "Person",
        "name": "Luca Da Corte",
        "url": "https://www.dacorte.dev/about"
      }
    }
</script>


As you can see, I reference six different CMS fields:

  • Title

  • Category

  • Description

  • ImageURL

  • (date) Published

  • (date) Modified


Due to how schema works in Framer, you’ll probably find yourself adding CMS fields just for the sake of being able to reference them from the schema markup.


For example, the “ImageURL” field I use in my structured data is created appositely for that.


My advice is not to get too fancy with it. Just include the most important information, or your CMS collection will soon become a mess.


And that’s it for the tutorial. I hope you liked it.


Thanks for reading!


- Luca

Luca Da Corte

Luca Da Corte is a certified Framer Expert and SEO specialist with over two years of experience. He's also the founder of clicks.supply, one of the biggest collections of Framer templates, components, and resoruces.

Luca Da Corte is a certified Framer Expert and SEO specialist with over two years of experience. He's also the founder of clicks.supply, one of the biggest collections of Framer templates, components, and resoruces.

Table Of Contents:

What Is Schema Markup?
Does Schema Markup Help With SEO?
Types Of Schema Markup
How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website
Schema Markup For CMS Pages

Table Of Contents:

Table Of Contents:

What Is Schema Markup?
Does Schema Markup Help With SEO?
Types Of Schema Markup
How To Add Schema Markup To A Framer Website
Schema Markup For CMS Pages

Related Articles:

Join Our Community

Receive updates on release dates, products, tips, and tutorials. No spam. Unsubscribe anytime.

Join Our Community

Receive updates on release dates, products, tips, and tutorials. No spam. Unsubscribe anytime.

Join Our Community

Receive updates on release dates, products, tips, and tutorials. No spam. Unsubscribe anytime.